Friday, June 15, 2018

TOGA Friday.....and zea mays



One of my favorite things (seriously) about going to the NC TOGA is driving by fields of corn.  I grew up in Ohio, in the Corn Belt.  NC is mostly unfriendly to corn but there are a few spots where the soil is good for corn.  I don't see it in Orange County where I live (no oranges there either) and I love seeing it here.  So each year's blog post about TOGA starts with a photo of corn.  No reason to change this year.

The Latin name for this crop is zea mays, called corn by Americans and maize by much of the rest of the world.  But you are not reading this blog for discussions of the Latin names of crops. 




Friday's activities are all at the church.  The church hall is set up for sewing, and Edna usually teaches a class demonstrating a simple sewing project.  Hand crank sewing machines are the usual choice, but no one gets thrown out for bringing a "tailed" machine.  (The tail is the electrical cord dangling down from the motor).




Outdoors people sell stuff from tables set up near their cars, and on the porch.  I sold 3 sewing machines to Joan and Bill, for use in teaching sewing to youngsters.  Sold one wooden ironing board and have two more.  Sold several vintage sewing boxes, and have several more.  Melissa took several Reader's Digest Guides to Sewing, which she gives away with each machine she sells (I do that too, but I have a serious surplus). 

 I didn't buy much, just a clear vintage thread box that matches several others that I already have and will stack on top ot them.  I'm always on the lookout for this one particular type and was thrilled to buy it from D'Nise.

And I accidentally acquired a Singer 237 from a woman who asked my advice on pricing a LaVencedora.  She decided to keep that one but tried to GIVE me a 237.  I told her it was potentially a great machine with value and she should sell it.  Treadleable Singer zigzaggers are rare-ish.  An hour later she needed $2 to buy some parts from another vendor and didn't have any small bills.  So she came to me and offered me the 237.  I had three dollar bills in my wallet so I gave them to her and laughed at myself.  The point of this trip is GETTING RID OF MACHINES NOT BRINGING MORE HOME!

Oh well, 3 out and 1 in is still a win.

I left around 3:00 pm for my obligatory afternoon nap.  Dinner with the gang this evening.


Tomorrow is the last day and the raffle.  I'll be back to tell you about that later.




5 comments:

  1. I came home with 9 machines from the River Rat TOGA. I left one treadle there (someone else was hauling it to it's new home) and I'd brought 2 other machines. Thank goodness one of those 9 machines was a Pony, that I was helping with. I'm going to be good at the Missouri TOGA next week, but, I already know of a machine I'm bringing home from the Michigan TOGA in July.

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  2. Oh, looks like so much fun! Some year, I'd love to come (probably not gonna happen since it's high gardening season here and I'm also seriously addicted to that). I've been checking out Ray and Sherri Elkins, who are doing "Sew Purty" restoration workshops and had one of the workshops coinciding with NC Toga. Does anyone know about them? I was thinking of (perhaps) hosting one of their events near me in Finger Lakes region NY. I love 237's -the ultimate in "hybrid" machines! Have you ever tried to adapt any other tailed zz's to treadle? I've been considering trying some of japanese models. Have you ever tried on one of them? Brother, White, Kenny's... ones on which the wheel and belt extend beyond the end of the bed?

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